. ,


"". S ( ) - . , (TALL), " x ?" , "". , . - , .

(x) = { 0, (x) < 150 .,

((x)-5ft.)/2ft., 150 <= (x) <= 210 ,

1, (x) > 210 . }

:

1.0 + +-------------------

| /

| /

0.5 + /

| /

| /

0.0 +-------------+-----+-------------------

| |

150 210

, . ->

:

ꠠ ࠠ

--------------------------------------

Billy 95 0.00 [ ]

Yoke 163 0.21

Drew 173 0.38

Erik 175 0.42

Mark 182 0.54

Kareem 215 1.00 [ ]

Expressions like "A is X" can be interpreted as degrees of truth, e.g., "Drew is TALL" = 0.38.

" X" , , "Drew, " = 0.38.

Note: Membership functions used in most applications almost never have as simple a shape as tall(x). At minimum, they tend to be triangles pointing up, and they can be much more complex than that. Also, the discussion characterizes membership functions as if they always are based on a single criterion, but this isn't always the case, although it is quite common. One could, for example, want to have the membership function for TALL depend on both a person's height and their age (he's tall for his age). This is perfectly legitimate, and occasionally used in practice.

    





Forekc.ru
, , , , , , , , , ,